leftoverbrain:

I will see you smiling from across that dark corner of the street. We have made it customary to turn right to that street and neither of us will begin to ask how the day has been for us. We never wanted to talk on the sidewalk until we reach that corner of gazebo. We never wanted that store on the right because of ill vendors, if not only for cheaper cigarettes. We are never good with decisions, and we never liked deciding. “6 sticks or 10?” I realized we never smoked 8 cigarettes when we’re together, only  6 or 10, unless one will insist we smoke one more going home.
 A few more steps and we’re in front of our favorite streetfood stall. 2 sticks of chickenballs, hot sauce, and 5 pesos of fishballs. A turn to the left and a few more steps then we’re in front of the small orange bakery. You choose 3-in-1 white coffee and sometimes, I choose brown. One time, it occurred to us that we never really asked the name of Kuya who would always make coffee for us. One night we asked, the other night we forgot, and we never asked again. It entertains us to see how he would explain which is which (brown and white coffee) as if he were a barista of some cozy café. You never allowed me to carry the cups. My sense of balance is never reliable, you said.
We would carry all these: the cigarettes, streetfood, and cups of coffee to that dim gazebo. On that eve of your birthday at the gazeebo, I never thought you were carrying something more. You cried. 

leftoverbrain:



I will see you smiling from across that dark corner of the street. We have made it customary to turn right to that street and neither of us will begin to ask how the day has been for us. We never wanted to talk on the sidewalk until we reach that corner of gazebo. We never wanted that store on the right because of ill vendors, if not only for cheaper cigarettes. We are never good with decisions, and we never liked deciding. “6 sticks or 10?” I realized we never smoked 8 cigarettes when we’re together, only  6 or 10, unless one will insist we smoke one more going home.

 A few more steps and we’re in front of our favorite streetfood stall. 2 sticks of chickenballs, hot sauce, and 5 pesos of fishballs. A turn to the left and a few more steps then we’re in front of the small orange bakery. You choose 3-in-1 white coffee and sometimes, I choose brown. One time, it occurred to us that we never really asked the name of Kuya who would always make coffee for us. One night we asked, the other night we forgot, and we never asked again. It entertains us to see how he would explain which is which (brown and white coffee) as if he were a barista of some cozy café. You never allowed me to carry the cups. My sense of balance is never reliable, you said.

We would carry all these: the cigarettes, streetfood, and cups of coffee to that dim gazebo. On that eve of your birthday at the gazeebo, I never thought you were carrying something more. You cried. 

2nd time at Scream Park. :3

2nd time at Scream Park. :3

Scream Park Manila <3

Scream Park Manila <3

NAGSASA ISLAND COVE IN ZAMBALES
1. It’s a five hour-ride from Manila.  You can travel by car and leave it in Pundaquit, the take off point to the islands in Zambales,  for Php 200 per night.
2. From Pundaquit, you will have to rent a boat for Php 2000. It’s an hour-boatride to the island. The waves may be a little scary. 
3.   Cellular phones are of no use. There’s no signal in there. No stressors too.
4.   There are few sari-sari stores in the Island. Expect that the prices are double the usual.  You may want to buy goods needed from their wet market before taking the boat, and be a little adventurous in cooking.
5. The stores sell bonfire for a hundred and fifty.
6. Bring flashlights. While you have the option to install lightbulb in your cottage for a hundred pesos, it’s still more thrilling and more adventurous to grope in the dark. 
7. The island has 6 common bathrooms.
8. You can also do a little trekking in the mountains surrounding the cove. 
9. The stores sell liquors. The most important.

NAGSASA ISLAND COVE IN ZAMBALES

1. It’s a five hour-ride from Manila.  You can travel by car and leave it in Pundaquit, the take off point to the islands in Zambales,  for Php 200 per night.

2. From Pundaquit, you will have to rent a boat for Php 2000. It’s an hour-boatride to the island. The waves may be a little scary. 

3.  Cellular phones are of no use. There’s no signal in there. No stressors too.

4.  There are few sari-sari stores in the Island. Expect that the prices are double the usual.  You may want to buy goods needed from their wet market before taking the boat, and be a little adventurous in cooking.

5. The stores sell bonfire for a hundred and fifty.

6. Bring flashlights. While you have the option to install lightbulb in your cottage for a hundred pesos, it’s still more thrilling and more adventurous to grope in the dark. 

7. The island has 6 common bathrooms.

8. You can also do a little trekking in the mountains surrounding the cove. 

9. The stores sell liquors. The most important.

Paper presentation at the University of Sto. Tomas. <3